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New DBS owners take factory tour

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General
Ausplow product manager Gary Andrews talks with a group of DBS owners about the production flow at the start of the tour.

Ausplow product manager Gary Andrews talks with a group of DBS owners about the production flow at the start of the tour.

Simone (left)and Levis MacKenzie talk with Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer about production schedules. Levis is manager of Daybreak Cropping at West River, and was looking forward to seeing the progress of a new DBS and Multistream ordered by Daybreak Cropping. “It’s being assembled at Cockburn and should be ready for the seeding season,” he said.

Simone (left)and Levis MacKenzie talk with Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer about production schedules. Levis is manager of Daybreak Cropping at West River, and was looking forward to seeing the progress of a new DBS and Multistream ordered by Daybreak Cropping. “It’s being assembled at Cockburn and should be ready for the seeding season,” he said.

Farmers Centre salesmen Ash Hayden (left) and Jakke Little with parts interpreter Jason Ramm. The trio are well versed in Ausplow products with specialised training from Ausplow staff.

Farmers Centre salesmen Ash Hayden (left) and Jakke Little with parts interpreter Jason Ramm. The trio are well versed in Ausplow products with specialised training from Ausplow staff.

Quality control was a big talking point during the tour with Ausplow production manager Gary Andrews (back to camera) explaining how minor flaws in this DBS cross section mean it is brought back into the blasting booth for re-treatment and re-painting.

Quality control was a big talking point during the tour with Ausplow production manager Gary Andrews (back to camera) explaining how minor flaws in this DBS cross section mean it is brought back into the blasting booth for re-treatment and re-painting.

Two ‘world class’ paint booths are the last stop in the processing schedule for DBS and Multistream components, which are then flat-packed for transportation to the Cockburn assembly factory.

Two ‘world class’ paint booths are the last stop in the processing schedule for DBS and Multistream components, which are then flat-packed for transportation to the Cockburn assembly factory.

Checking out a finished DBS section were Brett South (left), Beaumont, Farmers Centre salesman Sean Barrett, Des Chambers, Farmers Centre parts manager, Mark Tink, Ravensthorpe and Lyndon Mickel, Beaumont.

Checking out a finished DBS section were Brett South (left), Beaumont, Farmers Centre salesman Sean Barrett, Des Chambers, Farmers Centre parts manager, Mark Tink, Ravensthorpe and Lyndon Mickel, Beaumont.

About 30 new DBS owners from the Esperance district visited our Naval Base factory and Cockburn headquarters yesterday.
The visit was organised by our newest dealer, Farmers Centre, Esperance, with the tour party led by salesman Jason Wells.
According to Jason, Farmers Centre has received a positive reaction from local farmers as the new DBS dealer, after previous DBS dealers Ratten & Slater sold its business.
“It’s a great product which we’re also selling at our Ravensthorpe, Katanning, Lake Grace, Albany and Narrogin branches,“ Jason said.
“We thought it would be beneficial for owners to see how their machines are made and to catch up with the Ausplow staff to learn more about the company.”
Ausplow manager Chris Farmer said Farmers Centre had been quick off the mark to stock parts for the DBS and Multistream and had already made significant sales.
“The company has shown a very professional attitude and we are delighted Farmers Centre is part of the Ausplow dealership network,” he said.
“The company’s staff have all received product training and a big bonus is the addition of Jason Ramm as parts interpreter.
“Jason came across from Ratten & Slater and is very experienced with our products, so he provides part of which has been a seamless transition of our business to Farmers Centre.”
The group enjoyed an enlightening tour with Ausplow production manager Gary Andrews before heading to Cockburn to see how the DBS and Multistream were assembled.
They also talked with Ausplow engineers on a variety of topics, including research and development and gained an overview of changes to the DBS and Multistream from Ausplow’s national sales and marketing manager Chris Blight.

Ausplow goes solar

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General
Ausplow operations manager at Naval Base, Gary Andrews, checks out the recently-installed solar panels on the roof of the main factory.

Ausplow operations manager at Naval Base, Gary Andrews, checks out the recently-installed solar panels on the roof of the main factory.

Our Naval Base factory in Leath Road, has a new look with the addition of 200 solar panels, installed on the main factory roof.
It is a 75Kw system to provide complementary power to the main power grid and will help to offset power costs associated with production.
At peak time, there can be as many as 18 welders working full-time every day to meet our factory build schedule of DBS precision seeding bars and Multistream ‘multi-delivery’ air seeders.
The installation of the solar panels is in line with the company’s ethos of contributing to environmental management and taking advantage of renewable energy technology.
So far production for the 2018 season is on schedule and we will soon be welcoming many more new DBS and Multistream owners into the Ausplow ‘family’.
According to Ausplow managing director John Ryan, the company has started 2018 on a positive note with the upgrade at the Naval Base factory and he expects to have a lot of positive news to tell owners as the year progresses.
“We’re already gearing up for what might possibly be a record year of research and development through trial work to be established throughout our Australian market,” he said.
“As we have already said last year, a lot of trials will be held in partnership with Primaries CRT and the University of WA, via its Future Farm at Pingelly.
“Our partnerships with industry provides a unique opportunity for all parties to develop more cost- effective production strategies for farmers, which has always been a priority for our research and development team.
“I extend New Year greetings to all our owners and wish them the best of luck for the coming season.”

Hopes are high for another good year at Ausplow

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General
Ausplow Sales and Marketing Manager Chris Blight (left), General Manager Chris Farmer and Service Manager Ray Beacham.

Ausplow Sales and Marketing Manager Chris Blight (left), General Manager Chris Farmer and Service Manager Ray Beacham.

Josiane ‘Josie’ Sabouriaut (left), Mandy Tham and Kay Beacham.

Josiane ‘Josie’ Sabouriaut (left), Mandy Tham and Kay Beacham.

Ausplow Service Technician Dave Finlay (left), his partner Kady and Ausplow General Manager John Ryan.

Ausplow Service Technician Dave Finlay (left), his partner Kady and Ausplow General Manager John Ryan.

Borka (left) and Slobodan Rajkovic, who is an Engineer with Ausplow, company Assemble John Di Re, who celebrated 10 years service with the company in 2017, Procurement Manager Glenn Hubbard and Maggie Di Re.

Borka (left) and Slobodan Rajkovic, who is an Engineer with Ausplow, company Assemble John Di Re, who celebrated 10 years service with the company in 2017, Procurement Manager Glenn Hubbard and Maggie Di Re.

Tabita Adascalite (left), Ausplow Truck Driver Abel Adascalite, Rebekah Bautista, Ausplow Accountant and husband Reywin.

Tabita Adascalite (left), Ausplow Truck Driver Abel Adascalite, Rebekah Bautista, Ausplow Accountant and husband Reywin.

Ausplow Managing Director John Ryan and his partner Bernadette Turner.

Ausplow Managing Director John Ryan and his partner Bernadette Turner.

Ausplow celebrated its Christmas wind-up with staff at the Royal Fremantle Sailing Cub last Saturday night.

Company general manager Chris Farmer said that despite the difficult year, Ausplow had enjoyed good sales of DBS precision seeding bars, the Easitill deep ripper, the Multistream air seeder and retro-fits of the Pro-D tool system.
“Interestingly, it was a year when many DBS owners told us they wouldn’t have finished with a decent result had it not been for the DBS,” he said. “The ability of the machine to access moisture in dry conditions really shone through this year.”

Ausplow managing director John Ryan also complemented staff on their loyalty to the company and their continued positive attitude to farmers.

“Many of you are at the coalface meeting our customers and addressing concerns,” he said. “It’s so important we maintain that kind of sales back-up and service.

“I think 2018 will be a very exciting year for us as we move forward with new partners to expand our research and development programs.”

2018 orders rolling outing of factory

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General
Ausplow multistream m28000

Ausplow multistream m28000

Our flagship M28000 Multistream rolled out of our Cockburn Central factory this week bound for Albany. It was sold by Farmer’s Centre 1978 Albany and is one of many Multistreams heading to new homes for the 2018 season. 
Production has ramped up at all our factories and we are now out to late January and early February deliveries.

We still have some factory allocations available so please ring your local dealer to book a slot for your required machine or rig.
And remember, orders also can include our Easitill deep ripping range.

 

Ausplow creates history with collaboration

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Ausplow managing director John Ryan (left), the company’s sales and marketing manager Chris Blight and Nutrian director Dave Seagreen discuss the liquid delivery system on a DBS module during the factory tour with Primaries CRT agronomists at Jandakot this week.

Ausplow managing director John Ryan (left), the company’s sales and marketing manager Chris Blight and Nutrian director Dave Seagreen discuss the liquid delivery system on a DBS module during the factory tour with Primaries CRT agronomists at Jandakot this week.

Ausplow production manager Gary Andrews (centre left) and company general manager Chris Farmer explain the production processes to Primaries CRT agronomists during a factory tour that included visiting the company’s Jandakot and Naval Base factories.

Ausplow production manager Gary Andrews (centre left) and company general manager Chris Farmer explain the production processes to Primaries CRT agronomists during a factory tour that included visiting the company’s Jandakot and Naval Base factories.

Primaries CRT merchandise manager Fred Lyon (left), Ausplow sales and marketing manager Chris Blight, Ausplow general manager, Chris Farmer and Primaries CRT general manager Andrew Lindsay, pictured at this year’s Dowerin field days where last week’s  meeting and factory tour was finalised.

Primaries CRT merchandise manager Fred Lyon (left), Ausplow sales and marketing manager Chris Blight, Ausplow general manager, Chris Farmer and Primaries CRT general manager Andrew Lindsay, pictured at this year’s Dowerin field days where last week’s meeting and factory tour was finalised.

Ausplow design engineer Richard Woode explains to Primaries CRT agronomists. In the background are Ausplow engineering manager Carl Vance (left) and company production manager Gary Andrews (in doorway).

Ausplow design engineer Richard Woode explains to Primaries CRT agronomists. In the background are Ausplow engineering manager Carl Vance (left) and company production manager Gary Andrews (in doorway).

Ausplow this week created history with an official announcement of a collaborative research effort to progress liquid nutrients for improved crop and pasture establishment.
The company revealed it has been involved with liquid nutrient product manufacturer Nutrian and Primaries CRT since 2013 to improve a liquid placement system for the DBS precision seeder.
The announcement is historic because of the purpose-driven focus on integrating an efficient delivery system for liquid nutrients, in concert with trialling new liquid products with experienced agronomists.
It also heralds a new paradigm in the way crop establishment and nutrition in addressed.
Primaries CRT agronomists visited the Ausplow premises this week to familiarise themselves with the DBS/Multistream liquid delivery system.
They also took advantage of a factory tour and seminar to learn more about Nutrian’s liquid products and trial work involving Ausplow and Primaries CRT Gnowangerup branch manager Tom McInerney.
Ausplow managing director John Ryan said the event marked another milestone in the company’s quest to help farmers.
“This has been a long time coming,” he said. “We knew liquids had a future which is why I developed the Multistream in the early 2000s,” he said. “Adoption of liquids has been slow but it’s important all of us get it right and make it work.
“I’m very excited about the future of agriculture and as a company, we’re not slacking off.
“There’s more work to be done for this important industry.”
According to Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer, the company’s trial work so far has shown “we are on the right track”.
“And this collaborative research work with Primaries CRT and Nutrian fits the company’s strategy.
“We’re excited to be involved with people at the coalface because that’s where we started,” he said. “Our aim has always been to improve the soil for the benefit of crop and pasture production.
“And we were very keen to build a fit-for-purpose trial seeder that provided multiple methods of efficient product delivery to see what works in terms of all the liquid nutrients available.”
Primaries CRT merchandise manager Fred Lyon said the agreement would help to develop a “synergistic approach to in-furrow crop establishment and to enhance crop nutrition”.
“That’s why we have been working with Nutrian and Ausplow for the past four years in replicated trial work to assess the right products and delivery systems that can give farmers more confidence in using liquids going forward.
“There is a lot happening in this space and I believe in the future liquids will become a dominant management decision for broadacre crop establishment.
“We’re talking about seed dressings, fungicides, insecticides, nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium and trace elements.
“So our trial program will be focused on how best we can help farmers improve crop establishment and nutrition.
“Ausplow has kindly given us a fit-for-purpose DBS and Multistream trial seeder to try different delivery placements with liquids as well as different products in-furrow.
“In addition we also have been given three DBS modules, each with a liquid kit, which will enable us to explain to farmers what we are doing.
“Each of our branches will have the opportunity to be involved in the trials and the modules will be displayed at our branches.”
Nutrian director Dave Seagreen said the research work was a ’game-changer’ for agriculture.
“Our trials have helped us identify a lot of efficiencies using our liquid products.
Nutrian’s main product has been Calbud, which is a highly concentrated fully water-dispersible liquid fertiliser containing optimally synergistic ratios of calcium, zinc, nitrogen and magnesium with trace elements, to ensure strong early plant development.
But in recent years, the company has released crop specific products such as Canola Bud, Lupin Bud with a Wheat Bud product in development stages.
Other liquid products include lime, gypsum, manganese, magnesium, zinc, pasture, wetters and trace (a high analysis suspension of manganese, zinc, iron, copper blended with kelp extracts).

Ausplow cranking up 2018 production models

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General
Four Ausplow Multistreams in production at the Jandakot factory this week.

Four Ausplow Multistreams in production at the Jandakot factory this week.

It has been a busy week at Ausplow’s Jandakot factory as four Multistreams are assembled for various customers throughout Australia.

The models represented are – the M14,000 litre capacity, M18,000L, M22,000L and M28,000L. According to Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer, August rains and a soft finish has injected a lot of positivity into the WA industry with a subsequent lift in inquiry.
While the news is not that great for Queensland and northern New South Wales growers, the bulk of grain receivals from this year’s harvest is expected to come from southern NSW and Victoria, with South Australia  still looking at a variable result.

“Overall we’re very confident of experiencing another solid year of sales,” Chris said. “I would urge growers to talk with their local Ausplow dealer or contact us direct to discuss their requirements for next year.”

Regenerating poor-performing pastures with DBS

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General
Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer (left), Keith Ryan, who will be overseeing the pasture trials in New South Wales, Ausplow managing director John Ryan AM and Glen Innes, NSW farmer, Peter Alexander, pictured next to the Ausplow trial seeder. Keith, who is John’s brother, has had extensive experience and knowledge of deep tillage and the DBS system. Ausplow service manager Ray Beecham is obscured underneath the trial seeder. Ray plays a pivotal role visiting DBS owners throughout Australia.

Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer (left), Keith Ryan, who will be overseeing the pasture trials in New South Wales, Ausplow managing director John Ryan AM and Glen Innes, NSW farmer, Peter Alexander, pictured next to the Ausplow trial seeder. Keith, who is John’s brother, has had extensive experience and knowledge of deep tillage and the DBS system. Ausplow service manager Ray Beecham is obscured underneath the trial seeder. Ray plays a pivotal role visiting DBS owners throughout Australia.

Healthy germinations of brassica and ryegrass sown into ryegrass pasture. According to Ausplow managing director John Ryan AM, Ausplow has shown for more than two decades - since the introduction of the DBS - that aerating the soil, providing a water-harvesting trench and placing the seed at the optimal depth, are key features to properly establish and grow healthy plants. “In the case of cash crops, there’s a yield benefit and in the case of pasture crops there’s a huge nutritional benefit,” John said.

Healthy germinations of brassica and ryegrass sown into ryegrass pasture. According to Ausplow managing director John Ryan AM, Ausplow has shown for more than two decades - since the introduction of the DBS - that aerating the soil, providing a water-harvesting trench and placing the seed at the optimal depth, are key features to properly establish and grow healthy plants. “In the case of cash crops, there’s a yield benefit and in the case of pasture crops there’s a huge nutritional benefit,” John said.

Trial work on two northern New South Wales farms in the Tablelands, shows promise of unlocking potential to boost grazing pastures. Ausplow owner and managing director John Ryan AM has been working with Glen Innes farmers Peter Alexander (‘Whinstanes’) and Greg Chappell (‘Shannon Vale Station’) in establishing several trial sites on their respective properties.

The objective is to overcome so-called ‘green drought’ during which predominately perennial ryegrass roots languish in the topsoil, surrounded by moisture unable to infiltrate deeper in a compacted zone (enhancing water-logging). In summer, as the ground dries out, the crop stays green, growth is stunted and is of no nutritional value for stock (cattle) feed, and the crops rarely respond to urea treatments.

The conventional method of establishing perennial ryegrass is to use a disc seeder operating on seven inch (17.5cm) row spacings and seeding shallow.

That was done this year on Peter Alexander’s property weeks before John Ryan spoke to Peter and Greg about using a DBS trial seeder operating on 12 inch (30cm) spacings.

It is used to dig to a depth of seven inches, in effect cultivating below the seed and the existing pasture.

The machine also aerates the soil, while precisely placing fertiliser at a required depth and seed at an optimum shallow depth. In the trials on Peter’s property, using the Pro-D tillage system (without the ‘Plus’ or bottom plate), the DBS established brassica forage varieties, like sudax, and ryegrass, with a balanced liquid fertiliser and Calbud, which essentially is finely-ground dolomite for soil pH management and carbon addition.

In Greg’s trials, he opted for a balanced granular formula to plant ryegrass and Lucerne. Early autumn growth in the DBS-established trials on both properties have excited Peter and Greg and they are looking forward to continuing further trials in Spring to evaluate other planting options and to evaluate this first trial in terms of the spring flush. Traditionally, ryegrass is left as a perennial which is why John suggested sowing another crop with a deeper root system (taproot), to aerate the soil to allow plants to ‘hang on’ better in summer and for N-fixing.

“So basically, with the action of the DBS in breaking up soil hardpans and encouraging water infiltration, when temperatures rise, roots will be able to access moisture at depth and overcome that green drought in summer months,” John said.

“I think it’s a very exciting development for farmers who have struggled to produce strong, healthy pastures on land that over time has compacted, and therefore provided only a shallow zone for roots and moisture.

“The Northern Rivers districts, which have higher average rainfall, is also good cattle country and all the valleys are mostly fertile alluvial sandy loam, but the clay content has aided soil compaction, along with trafficking and weathering. “Deep ripping is not an option in the Tablelands region, in the typical sandier alluvial soil, because of the abundance of subsoil obstructions, such as rocks.

“But in this country, the DBS works well, as it does in similar soils throughout the Australian wheatbelt. And remember, there will be no need for the higher horsepower tractors, which are needed for deep ripping. “Typically you can assume a horsepower requirement pulling the DBS of 8-10hp a tine.

“So, on a 12 foot machine, with 10 tines, you’re looking at between 80 and 100hp to pull the DBS. “We have shown for more than two decades - since the introduction of the DBS - that aerating the soil, providing a water-harvesting trench and placing the seed at the optimal depth, are key features to properly establish and grow healthy plants.

“In the case of cash crops, there’s a yield benefit and in the case of pasture crops there’s a huge nutritional benefit.” “Interestingly, the regeneration system could save water because of effective infiltration and reduced run-off.” The big bonus of the trials, according to John, will be the flush of African love grass which can be slashed and the cattle then eat the new shoots.

“No chemicals will be needed which is a big cost saving and I think you’ll see this type of pressure on love grass will reduce its seed population,” he said. “It also could have the benefit to compete with carpet grass and therefore there will be no need to spray out pastures. “You can retain all the grasses and have the benefits of improved water infiltration and new growth as plant roots navigate old root pathways to access deeper moisture.”

When the next set of trials are planned (for Spring planting this year), John said more plant options would come under consideration. “The benefit of perennial ryegrass of course, is that it’s permanent and you don’t have to plant every year,” he said.

“And it responds very well to a deep working. “But options could include soy beans for the nitrogen benefit, or sudax with a large fibrous root, which can also be cut for silage. “Or Lucerne, with a longer tap root, which also can be cut for silage.

“Both sudax and Lucerne will facilitate oxygen at depth by aerating the soil. “This will assist in plant root breakdown into soil humus. “For Spring sowings you could establish tropical grasses, like dolichus lablab, which has attributes of deep rooting, is an excellent forage crop and it fixes nitrogen.”

John also mentioned his work was partly inspired by Colonel Harold Fletcher White (1883-1971), a grazier and soldier who was one of the early pioneers of pasture development in his district at Guyra. And currently he is impressed by work done by retired CSIRO principal soil scientist Dr Margaret Roper who is revealing some exciting side benefits of her work into overcoming water-repellent soils.

Machinery field days round a great success

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General
Ausplow engineering manager Carl Vance (left) and marketing and sales manager Chris Blight were kept busy during the field days as they fielded questions from farmers about the company’s R&D to develop a liquid delivery system for in-row or edge-row applications using Friction Flow tubing from Furrow Management Systems.

Ausplow engineering manager Carl Vance (left) and marketing and sales manager Chris Blight were kept busy during the field days as they fielded questions from farmers about the company’s R&D to develop a liquid delivery system for in-row or edge-row applications using Friction Flow tubing from Furrow Management Systems.

Ausplow staff were out in force at the Dowerin field days assisting owners and prospective owners with inquiries.

Ausplow staff were out in force at the Dowerin field days assisting owners and prospective owners with inquiries.

Ausplow engineering manager Carl Vance (left) and Ausplow marketing and sales manager Chris Blight show off the company’s new stainless steel auger for the Series II Multistream.

Ausplow engineering manager Carl Vance (left) and Ausplow marketing and sales manager Chris Blight show off the company’s new stainless steel auger for the Series II Multistream.

The machinery field days round throughout Australia was a huge success for Ausplow. Our new products, along with our existing product range, drew strong inquiry and there were plenty of questions from farmers relating to the company’s R & D program. There’s obviously a lot of farmers talking about Ausplow’s efforts to remain at the cutting edge of machinery development to improve farm productivity. One of the new products released was a Series II Multistream auger. Made of stainless steel, the 25cm (10in)-diameter auger tube will last owners a life-time, with many new features., including polymer-cupped flighting for increased efficiency, reduced noise and reduced seed damage. Hydraulic disc brake articulation is another feature, for free and balanced movement when unlocked - just press the brake button to keep in position. The hydraulic-powered inclination, not only makes it easier to handle, with no more lifting, but it is safer and easier to stow once a task has been completed. And an emergency stop circuit button at either end of the auger is industry-leading. An optional lighting package, illuminates both ends of the auger and a hopper hungry board increases the capacity of the standard hopper for an improved fill process. Another big interest at the Ausplow displays was the company’s moves towards liquid application kits. The company is purposely moving towards a liquid delivery system for in-row or edge-row applications using Friction Flow tubing from Furrow Management Systems. “We’re collaborating with Furrow Management Systems to maintain various products in suspension from tank to furrow, eliminating blockages,” Ausplow marketing and sales manager Chris Blight said. “Using this system will be more beneficial for section control and variable rate applications in lieu of nozzles.”

Swan Hill farmers take Ausplow factory tour

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Ausplow factory manager Gary Andrews (yellow safety vest) explains the sand blasting process to a group of Swan Hill farmers during a recent factory tour.

Ausplow factory manager Gary Andrews (yellow safety vest) explains the sand blasting process to a group of Swan Hill farmers during a recent factory tour.

Ausplow sales and marketing manager Chris Blight (yellow safety vest) provided a detailed explanation of the Ausplow DBS precision seeder and an insight into some of the R & D programs Ausplow is involved in.

Ausplow sales and marketing manager Chris Blight (yellow safety vest) provided a detailed explanation of the Ausplow DBS precision seeder and an insight into some of the R & D programs Ausplow is involved in.

Australian manufacturing was at its best when a group of farmers from Swan Hill, Victoria, visited Ausplow’s Naval Base factory recently.
The group, visiting WA in conjunction with their local Elders representative, were impressed with the manufacturing process starting with raw steel at one end and progressing through to the finished product.
The group was impressed with the state-of-the-art facilities, which included sand blasting and painting booths.
This is the second factory tour arranged by Elders Swan Hill, and positive feedback suggests another tour maybe on the cards in the future.

Ausplow team heads to the Eastern States

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Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer (left) and the company's sales and marketing manager Chris Blight re planning to expand Ausplow's market in the Eastern States.

Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer (left) and the company's sales and marketing manager Chris Blight re planning to expand Ausplow's market in the Eastern States.

Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer and sales and marketing manager Chris Blight are off to the Eastern States later this month as part of a new phase for Ausplow’s growth. With increasing inquiry from the New South Wales farmers, in particular, the pair will scope the market while looking to expand the company’s dealer network and talking with existing DBS owners. “We’ll also be visiting Peter Alexander’s farm at Glen Innes to look over his pasture trials, which involve our DBS trial seeder,” Chris Farmer said. “There is growing interest in pasture renovation as we discussed in our June Ausfacts newsletter and it’s an exciting area we believe can bring a lot of sustainable and profitable benefits to a mixed farming system. ‘’As far as our market expansion goes, it’s more organic growth as we continue to support our customers and we are continuing to build on those relationships to not only provide the best equipment for their needs but also to gain valuable feedback for our product development.’’ The pair also will visit the Gunnedah field days on August 22-24 as part of a national presence by Ausplow at all major field days.

Look out for Ausplow at the following events:

  • Mallee Machinery Field Days, Speed, Victoria, August 2 & 3
  • Mingenew Midwest Expo, Mingenew, WA, August 16 & 17
  • Dowerin Machinery Field Days, Dowerin, WA, August 30 & 31
  • Newdegate Machinery Field Days, Newdegate, WA, September 6 & 7
  • Henty Machinery Field Days, Henty, NSW, September 19, 20 & 21
  • Yorke Peninsula Field Days, Paskeville, SA, September 26, 27 & 28
  • Elmore Field Days, Elmore, Victoria, October 3, 4 & 5.

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