Multistream sells out for 2022

category: 
Ausplow Factory
Another Ausplow Multistream air seeder left the Ausplow factory last week bound for Ausplow Albany dealers Farmers Centre 1978 Pty Ltd which has sold the liquid-ready unit to a local farmer. Increased popularity of the Multistream has seen factory production slots filled until June 2022 with forward orders for 2023. This model is a 28,000 litre tow-between with seven poly tanks to cater for multiple liquid mixes.

Another Ausplow Multistream air seeder left the Ausplow factory last week bound for Ausplow Albany dealers Farmers Centre 1978 Pty Ltd which has sold the liquid-ready unit to a local farmer. Increased popularity of the Multistream has seen factory production slots filled until June 2022 with forward orders for 2023. This model is a 28,000 litre tow-between with seven poly tanks to cater for multiple liquid mixes.

The increasing popularity of Ausplow’s Multistream airseeder, with liquid capabilities, has resulted in a full order book for the 2022 seeding season, with demand spilling over to fill production spots for the 2023 season.
There is a possibility for several production slots in May 2022 for post seeding delivery and interested DBS owners are urged to contact their local dealer for more details.
Factory orders for DBS precision seeders for 2022 were filled several months ago.
According to Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer, the company is poised for more growth on the back of increased demand for the Multistream.
“As the name implies, it has the capacity to handle multiple liquids which is a desirable feature for farmers expanding their liquid requirements,” Chris said. “The most popular option at the moment is a dual liquid feed to deep band liquid compound fertilisers while injecting wetters with the seed.
“There are other owners who require more tanks as they embrace liquid trace elements and other liquid nutrient mixes streaming to strategically-placed locations on the DBS module.
“This is then delivered in a pencil stream under pressure into the soil.”
The Multistream is designed with electric-over-hydraulic variable rate technology and liquid section control.
The main new features include:
• A stainless-steel air system, implement guidance systems-ready and an updated hydraulic control valve which is ISOBUS-compatible to suit the most popular controllers in the market;
• A fully hydraulic 10-inch (250mm) diameter auger with remote control as standard (stainless steel barrel and smooth poly-cupped flytes, delivering gentle and quiet action to reduce seed and fertiliser damage);
• Hydraulic metering to suit variable rate applications from prescription maps;
• A dual fan option to cater for higher rates and wider bars;
• A stainless steel Hypro pump with ‘dial-up’ agitation;
• Push-button LED light package mounted on the chassis for implements, service, walkway, auger and safety;
• Diversion of heated air from the heat exchanger into delivery hoses; separate looms for lights, cameras and controller;
• Marine-grade stainless steel metering units;
• Optional cameras are fitted onto the granular metering unit;
• Choice of tyres or tracks and a re-designed safety platform (tow-behind models).
• Collapsible walkway.
All models come in tow-between configurations with specific tow-behind models being the M14000, M15000, M18000 and M19500. And there’s a specialist polyethylene small tank (1500L) for small seeds, dry inoculants and other granular-type products.
Models come with single or dual wheels, and for CTF systems options for three-metre centres.
“We’ve also done a lot of work to make the Multistream more functional and easier to use and service,” Chris said.
“An example is the positioning of a small accumulator as oil enters the heat exchanger radiator to eliminate oil surges.
“Such events cause high pressure and can crack the radiator.
“There’s also the ability to bridge tanks to suit product configurations.
“We have capacities from 1500 litres to 4700L which can be bridged, for example, a 4700L and a 4400L to give you 9100L of the same product.
“Another example is a separate fill station with a three-inch (75mm) connection for faster fill, which comes as standard on all models.
“And the stainless cabinet which houses the liquid work station is easily accessed for service and has an added feature where you can flush the bar circuit, apart from tank rinse and purging controls.
“We’ve also designed a stand-alone hungry board to attach to the auger hopper to increase in-fill capacity.
“This can then be easily and quickly removed when the auger is used for back-fill.”

Customer focus hallmark of success

category: 
Ausplow Factory
Wongan Hills dealership Boekeman Machinery toured Ausplow’s Naval Base factory last month with Ausplow owners and prospective clients keen to hear the company’s latest news. Here, company managing director and DBS inventor John Ryan (left) talks with Bindoon farmer Kristen Kelly and Boekeman Machinery salesman Ben Boekeman. Kristen has owned a 12.2 metre DBS for three years and picked up some handy information during the tour.

Wongan Hills dealership Boekeman Machinery toured Ausplow’s Naval Base factory last month with Ausplow owners and prospective clients keen to hear the company’s latest news. Here, company managing director and DBS inventor John Ryan (left) talks with Bindoon farmer Kristen Kelly and Boekeman Machinery salesman Ben Boekeman. Kristen has owned a 12.2 metre DBS for three years and picked up some handy information during the tour.

ONE of the main reasons for the success of WA manufacturer Ausplow is its focus on customers.
According to sales and marketing manager Chris Blight, Ausplow staff travel throughout Australia to talk with customers.
“Our after-sales service doesn’t stop,” he said. “We are always focusing on building good relationships and the bonus for us is the good feedback we get that is important to our research and development work.”
A more recent example was a northern Wheatbelt farmer who suggested bigger floatation wheels for the DBS to better negotiate deep-ripped country.
“About 70 per cent of our bars are now sold with floatation tyres,” Chris said.
Another example was a suggestion from the company’s South Australia representative, who after speaking with customers, suggested changes to the mud scraper on the seeding assembly.
“That’s now a standard feature,” Chris said.
Being the biggest seeding and tillage manufacturer in Australia does draw copy-cat designs but according to company general manager Chris Farmer, the salient difference between the company and the copy-cats is the reason why Ausplow entered the market.
“We’ve always been focused on the agronomic aspects of tillage and seeding when we design equipment,” he said. “We’re not just making steel.
“There’s more to it than planting seed.”

Christmas cheer from Ausplow

category: 
Ausplow Factory
Ausplow Managing Director John Ryan AM and his partner Bernadette Turner enjoyed mixing with the staff at yesterday’s wind-up held at the Fremantle Sailing Club.

Ausplow Managing Director John Ryan AM and his partner Bernadette Turner enjoyed mixing with the staff at yesterday’s wind-up held at the Fremantle Sailing Club.

Ausplow sales and marketing manager Chris Blight (middle) was recognised for his 10 years’ service with the company. Flanking him are Managing Director John Ryan AM and General Manager Chris Farmer.

Ausplow sales and marketing manager Chris Blight (middle) was recognised for his 10 years’ service with the company. Flanking him are Managing Director John Ryan AM and General Manager Chris Farmer.

Independent liquid nutrient consultant and chemist Dave Seagreen with his wife Chantelle. Dave is involved in Ausplow’s liquid trials at the company’s Quairading trial site.

Independent liquid nutrient consultant and chemist Dave Seagreen with his wife Chantelle. Dave is involved in Ausplow’s liquid trials at the company’s Quairading trial site.

Dr Margaret Roper and Ausplow Managing Director John Ryan AM. Dr Roper is playing a pivotal role in Ausplow’s research and development program with her background as a CSIRO scientist specialising in micro-biology.

Dr Margaret Roper and Ausplow Managing Director John Ryan AM. Dr Roper is playing a pivotal role in Ausplow’s research and development program with her background as a CSIRO scientist specialising in micro-biology.

Enjoying yesterday’s company wind-up at the Fremantle Sailing Club were Ausplow service manager Ray Beacham and his wife Kay.

Enjoying yesterday’s company wind-up at the Fremantle Sailing Club were Ausplow service manager Ray Beacham and his wife Kay.

Production manager Titus Galsorthy (left) and sales and marketing manager Chris Blight.

Production manager Titus Galsorthy (left) and sales and marketing manager Chris Blight.

Assembly supervisor Claude Vinci and his wife Ronnalyn.

Assembly supervisor Claude Vinci and his wife Ronnalyn.

Production management administrator Adam Baldwin with his wife Cindy and son Chayton.

Production management administrator Adam Baldwin with his wife Cindy and son Chayton.

Company engineer Comy Sumoro (left) with Borka and Slobodan Rajkovic. Slobodan also is an engineer with the company.

Company engineer Comy Sumoro (left) with Borka and Slobodan Rajkovic. Slobodan also is an engineer with the company.

Operations manager Gary Andrews and partner Kris Metcher.

Operations manager Gary Andrews and partner Kris Metcher.

This happy group of welders and boilermakers included father-son combination, fabricator Nolan Panaligan (right front) and Christian (left front), who is a welder.  Behind Nolan are welders Jerson and Teo and boilermaker Nick.

This happy group of welders and boilermakers included father-son combination, fabricator Nolan Panaligan (right front) and Christian (left front), who is a welder. Behind Nolan are welders Jerson and Teo and boilermaker Nick.

Ausplow warehouse manager Stuart Kerr (left) and his wife Jo enjoyed yesterday’s wind-up.

Ausplow warehouse manager Stuart Kerr (left) and his wife Jo enjoyed yesterday’s wind-up.

Ausplow Managing Director John Ryan AM with production engineer Krunal Patel.

Ausplow Managing Director John Ryan AM with production engineer Krunal Patel.

It’s onwards and upwards for Ausplow.
That’s the message from Managing Director and owner John Ryan AM at the company’s annual Christmas staff party held at Fremantle Sailing Club yesterday.
“It has been another good year with strong sales,” he said. “Looking at our efforts, we’re actually defying the downturn in the economy and the drought-ravaged States.
“We’ve got a full order bank for 2020 and we’ve already taken orders for 2021 so we’re in a good position.
“I think we can look forward to another exciting year, particularly our research and development program which among things is focusing on our liquid nutrient trials at Quairading.
“Our new Multistream II was released this year and going forward I expect that will become a big part of our product portfolio, particularly with the development of optional liquid section control. We will also trial a patented granular section control system next year.
“I would like to thank our dedicated staff for their efforts this year and wish everybody, including our customers and suppliers, a very Merry Christmas.”

Owners schools great sucess

category: 
Ausplow Factory
Ausplow sales and marketing manager Chris Blight has a captive audience at a recent Boekeman Machinery owners’ school at Wongan Hills. DBS owners and their workers, new and prospective owners and Boekeman staff attended the day.

Ausplow sales and marketing manager Chris Blight has a captive audience at a recent Boekeman Machinery owners’ school at Wongan Hills. DBS owners and their workers, new and prospective owners and Boekeman staff attended the day.

The DBS and Multistream were displayed so farmers could check out new changes to the products. A discussion on parts also proved popular.

The DBS and Multistream were displayed so farmers could check out new changes to the products. A discussion on parts also proved popular.

Ausplow sales and marketing manager Chris Blight recently completed an Australia-wide owners’ school trip to update dealers and new, existing and potential owners on the latest changes that have been made to the DBS Version Four and Multistream Version Two.
His five-week trip saw him overseeing tillage schools involving dealers, owners and prospective owners throughout WA, SA, Victoria and NSW.
While farmers are used to header and spraying schools, the annual Ausplow tillage schools, which have been held for two decades, are a fairly rare event in the bush.
And Chris and his team will do it all over again during seeding, visiting new owners with dealers to ensure owners get as much assistance as possible to enhance productivity.
“We want owners to have a great experience with our support,” he said. “Seeding equipment is arguably the most important equipment on the farm and we understand what a huge investment it is.
“So we want to make sure new owners, particularly, step off on the right foot, so to speak, confident they’ve got the necessary information for crop establishment.
“I think it also is important that we build relationships with owners and dealers for better communication and to ensure we’re all on the same page.
“That’s what I mean when I say being involved with Ausplow should be a great experience not just a good experience.”
According to WA dealership Boekeman Machinery, the owners’ schools just keep getting better.
“We had 20 customers attend our day along with farm workers and potential clients,” company representative Ben Boekeman said.
“It was a really positive day with Chris Blight explaining how Ausplow is improving its products to meet customer expectations,” he said. “And he was available to everybody to answer questions and take feedback.
“The school is very valuable for us as a dealership because all our staff get involved, from parts, to sales through to service, so there’s a common understanding about the products.
“And Ausplow follow that up with visits to new owners to help us with the handover and then come back again to see how our owners are doing during seeding and helping with any issues.
“Their support to us is very strong and it has meant we have developed a very good relationship with them and we regularly communicate to each other.”
According to Ben, the standout at this year’s ‘school’ was were changes made to the Multistream.
“Since Ausplow displayed the new Version Two model at last year’s Dowerin field days, we got a lot of inquiry which has since translated into orders for the 2020 season,” he said.
“We are off to a good start for 2020 with the early order discount program and I expect orders will come in strongly once farmers get a good feel for the season.”

Strong ordering surge for 2019

category: 
Ausplow Factory
Our first two pasture regeneration DBS planters have left our factory bound for New South Wales. We expect growing interest in these planters in 2019.

Our first two pasture regeneration DBS planters have left our factory bound for New South Wales. We expect growing interest in these planters in 2019.

A strong late ordering surge has fully tested our new manufacturing facilities at Naval Base.
And according to Ausplow managing director John Ryan AM it marks another positive step in consolidating the company as Australia’s leading precision seeding manufacturer.
“We experienced forward orders early in 2018 for the 2019 season and after the field days we took of a lot more orders, including for our new Multistream,” he said.
“I think last year really showed the value of the DBS with the dry start, particularly for farmers with big programs to complete within the ideal sowing window.
“I have spoken with a lot of DBS owners who tell me they feel more confident starting earlier even in dry conditions.
“And if there is minimal subsoil moisture there’s the bonus of getting the crop away quickly, setting up potentially higher yields.
“It is pretty well established now that the action of the DBS can create a wick effect to wet up seed beds which also alleviates worry about encountering a wet/dry scenario in the seed bed.”
With Multistream orders, John says it reflects the need of farmers to have a no-fuss machine to handle granular and liquid product deliveries.
“We got a lot of interest in the new model at the field days,” he said. “We have added a new air kit to enhance product flow to the DBS and our hose kit includes Friction Flow tubing, which has been a winner with our nano-size technology liquid products.
“And we also re-designed our auger with industrial-grade plastic flighting encased in a stainless-steel tube.”
The other new product triggering positive feedback was the Pro-D tool system.
“We had a lot of retro-fits to existing DBS bars and the feedback reflected several reasons for farmers switching over,” John said.
“Some wanted the easier working depth change for different soil types while seeding because it saved a lot of time while others saw value in changing working depths for renovating pastures or maintenance rips on deep ripped country.
“I have to emphasise the Pro-D is not useful for deep ripping but it can handle ripping with the nine-inch blades in previously ripped country.
“I see the Pro-D as an excellent tool for renovating pastures, particularly in the spring to create a flush of summer feed for livestock.”

Ausplow sets out exciting plans for 2019

category: 
Ausplow Factory
Ausplow managing director John Ryan AM and his partner Bernadette Turner welcomed guests at last Saturday’s annual Ausplow Christmas wind-up at the Fremantle Sailing Club.

Ausplow managing director John Ryan AM and his partner Bernadette Turner welcomed guests at last Saturday’s annual Ausplow Christmas wind-up at the Fremantle Sailing Club.

Former CSIRO soil scientist Dr Margaret Roper caught up with Ausplow managing director John Ryan AM. Pictured with Margaret is her husband John Hanratty.

Former CSIRO soil scientist Dr Margaret Roper caught up with Ausplow managing director John Ryan AM. Pictured with Margaret is her husband John Hanratty.

Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer (left) and marketing and sales manager Chris Blight flank Chris Blight’s partner Josianne ‘Josie’ Sabouriaut.

Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer (left) and marketing and sales manager Chris Blight flank Chris Blight’s partner Josianne ‘Josie’ Sabouriaut.

Ausplow service technician Dave Finlay (left) with assemblers Tony Kennedy and Neil Langford. (Ausplow marketing and sales manager Chris Blight is obscured on the left).

Ausplow service technician Dave Finlay (left) with assemblers Tony Kennedy and Neil Langford. (Ausplow marketing and sales manager Chris Blight is obscured on the left).

Ausplow engineering manager Carol Erasmus (left) and her mother Melody were kept busy with Carol’s daughters Aria (left) and Carley, who didn’t want their photograph taken.

Ausplow engineering manager Carol Erasmus (left) and her mother Melody were kept busy with Carol’s daughters Aria (left) and Carley, who didn’t want their photograph taken.

Enjoying the pleasant surrounds of the Fremantle Sailing Club were Ausplow procurement manager Glenn Hubbard with his wife Ann.

Enjoying the pleasant surrounds of the Fremantle Sailing Club were Ausplow procurement manager Glenn Hubbard with his wife Ann.

It’s onward and upwards for Ausplow Farming Systems, according to its owner and managing director John Ryan AM.
Foremost in John’s mind was the outstanding finish by most DBS owners who reported surprisingly higher-yielding crops than forecast.
“The dry start to this year again showed the value of the DBS in achieving good plant establishment even in dry conditions,” John said. “Deeper cultivation below the seed is paramount to ensure roots have easier access to subsoil moisture and this was the case this year with owners reporting crops hanging on and obviously accessing summer moisture that fell in January and February.”
John already is in planning mode for next year with several exciting trials already on the drawing board along with a ‘proof of concept’ trial which John says could be a game-changer for broadacre crop-establishment.
“I’m looking forward to another interesting year as we continue our journey with DBS owners to improve all aspects of crop establishment,” he said.
“We move towards 2019 with a very healthy order book which reinforces our leading position in the market.
“And our aim is to stay on top, driven by our growing relationships with our owners and our desire to improve our technology.
“I would like to wish my staff, the farming community, our suppliers and friends a very special Happy Christmas.
“It’s a special family I’m very proud of and I hope everybody enjoys a good break and re-boots for 2019.”

Ausplow moves ahead of steel price rises

category: 
Ausplow Factory
Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer checks over the latest delivery of steel at the company’s Naval Base factory this week. An astute ordering move means there will be no price increases related to imminent price rises in steel.

Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer checks over the latest delivery of steel at the company’s Naval Base factory this week. An astute ordering move means there will be no price increases related to imminent price rises in steel.

With recent news of an imminent price rise in steel, said to be around nine per cent, Ausplow has purchased six months usage of steel at old prices in order to beat the steel price rises and hence hold off price increases as long as we can.
We also have some availability for February, March and April deliveries of Auseeder DBS bars.
Unfortunately orders for our Multistream is basically closed for the 2018/2019 season.
“We have had very strong demand for both bars and bins this season and with harvest underway and seemingly going well we are expecting our order books to close out over the coming months,” Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer said. “We have hired additional production labour to keep up with the strong sales demand for next season.”

New upgrades to Series II Multistream

category: 
Ausplow Factory
Farmers Centre Esperance salesman Jakke Little (left) is taken on a walk-round of the Series II Multistream at the Newedegate Machinery Field Days earlier this month by Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer. Significant changes have been made for 2019 models.

Farmers Centre Esperance salesman Jakke Little (left) is taken on a walk-round of the Series II Multistream at the Newedegate Machinery Field Days earlier this month by Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer. Significant changes have been made for 2019 models.

Our new stability wheel is another improvement we have made to the DBS. It prevents the bar from digging in at the front and lifting up at the rear.

Our new stability wheel is another improvement we have made to the DBS. It prevents the bar from digging in at the front and lifting up at the rear.

Ausplow debuted its new Series II Multistream at the Dowerin and Newdegate field days and finished the events with a healthy inquiry list.
“A lot of people who came and saw us will probably order one if the season finishes well,” company general manager Chris Farmer said.
Standout improvements include a stainless-steel auger with poly-cupped flighting, which was a purpose design to greatly reduce or eliminate grain damage along with quiet running and increased throughput.
There’s reduced residual in the hopper for clean-out, along with a hydraulically-assisted and braked auger (with remote control) to make the auger easier tot operate.
Enhancements also have been made to the safety ladder, step-over and walkway with the option for a range of light kits.
The pump station has been enclosed and is ergonomically positioned for ease of access and servicing.
It can be retro-fitted to existing Multistream models to convert to liquid or a granular-liquid mix.
Another interesting option is a ProTrakker hitch with electrics supplied by Burando Hill.
In tow-between configuration, the hitch attached to the DBS for RTK guidance side-furrow sowing.
And all hydraulic lines are laid out on ‘cable trays’ running the length of the Multistream.
“All our poly tanks easily convert from granular to liquid and there’s a lot of flexibility in product splits,” Chris said.
“We’ll also have the capacity for liquid sectional control.”
The Multistream is available with capacities from 6000 litres to 28,000L.
Interestingly, when it was first released in 2001, it was the world’s first air seeder with liquid capacity. Today it’s a standard feature on most air seeders sold throughout Australia.
Chris also said there was positive feedback from customers about the commercial introduction of the stability wheels on DBS bars that were successfully trialed this season in dry and hard conditions to help reduce the effect of ‘wind-up’ in those conditions. Effectively, it prevents the bar from digging in at the front and lifting up at the rear.

Cunderdin students visit Ausplow's factory

category: 
Ausplow Factory
WA College of Agriculture students are shown over Ausplow's state-of-the-art factory at Naval Base.

WA College of Agriculture students are shown over Ausplow's state-of-the-art factory at Naval Base.

Students gather round to hear how stages of manufacture are accomplished.

Students gather round to hear how stages of manufacture are accomplished.

A total of 19 WA College of Agriculture, Cunderdin students witnessed the latest in precision seeding technology on a tour of the Ausplow factory in Naval Base this week.

The factory tour included a visit to the welding, fabrication, blast and painting assembly areas. The design principles and benefits of the DBS, or Deep Blade System, was explained to the students by Ausplow General Manager Chris Farmer.

Chris explained how the DBS knife blade, closing tool and press wheel assembly were designed to achieve sub-soil cultivation, precision seed placement and enhanced water harvesting.

Students were particularly fascinated with the use of 3D printers in the design process of the component parts and the state-of-the-art blast and paint areas.

“Students were extremely engaged and it gave them a better understanding of the DBS bar and tank that we use for the College seeding programme,” College technical officer Shane Childs said.

“One of the students was particularly interested to understand the process, as his family farming enterprise had recently ordered a DBS Multistream airseeder”.

Students were also able to speak to engineering staff on pathways for career development post-secondary education.

A visit to the CBH Grain Handling facility and Museum in Kwinana followed the Ausplow factory tour.

According to Chris, Ausplow is an enthusiastic participant in promoting education of the industry to encourage young people in career pathways.

“It’s an exciting and important industry and the students were very impressed to see the technologies we use as a manufacturer,” he said. “I think it also is important that they see a WA manufacturer playing a major role in the Australian industry.”

Ausplow goes solar

category: 
Ausplow Factory
Ausplow operations manager at Naval Base, Gary Andrews, checks out the recently-installed solar panels on the roof of the main factory.

Ausplow operations manager at Naval Base, Gary Andrews, checks out the recently-installed solar panels on the roof of the main factory.

Our Naval Base factory in Leath Road, has a new look with the addition of 200 solar panels, installed on the main factory roof.
It is a 75Kw system to provide complementary power to the main power grid and will help to offset power costs associated with production.
At peak time, there can be as many as 18 welders working full-time every day to meet our factory build schedule of DBS precision seeding bars and Multistream ‘multi-delivery’ air seeders.
The installation of the solar panels is in line with the company’s ethos of contributing to environmental management and taking advantage of renewable energy technology.
So far production for the 2018 season is on schedule and we will soon be welcoming many more new DBS and Multistream owners into the Ausplow ‘family’.
According to Ausplow managing director John Ryan, the company has started 2018 on a positive note with the upgrade at the Naval Base factory and he expects to have a lot of positive news to tell owners as the year progresses.
“We’re already gearing up for what might possibly be a record year of research and development through trial work to be established throughout our Australian market,” he said.
“As we have already said last year, a lot of trials will be held in partnership with Primaries CRT and the University of WA, via its Future Farm at Pingelly.
“Our partnerships with industry provides a unique opportunity for all parties to develop more cost- effective production strategies for farmers, which has always been a priority for our research and development team.
“I extend New Year greetings to all our owners and wish them the best of luck for the coming season.”

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