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Ausplow trials showing promise

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Ausplow researcher and former CSIRO scientist specialising in microbiology, Dr Margaret Roper, taking plant head counts at the Ausplopw  Quairading trial site. "The plants have stood up well considering the low growing season rainfall,"she said.

Ausplow researcher and former CSIRO scientist specialising in microbiology, Dr Margaret Roper, taking plant head counts at the Ausplopw Quairading trial site. "The plants have stood up well considering the low growing season rainfall,"she said.

In-furrow nutrient management is clearly showing promising signs at Ausplow’s 190ha research and development site (143 acres arable) at Quairading.
This year the company established 40 innovative trials to compare granular and liquid fertilisers, with a long-term viewpoint to analyse the benefits of near-row sowing.
Particular focus is on ‘new age’ liquid nutrients developed in conjunction with Loveland Agri Products Research and Development Director Dave Seagreen. Loveland Agri products is a subsidiary of Landmark.
The trials, with controls, are being overseen by Dr Roper, in conjunction with Primaries trial Project Manager John Simpson.
“Essentially we’re evaluating Ausplow’s current system of granular and liquid delivery with a range of new liquid fertilisers, nutrients and trace elements,” Dr Roper said.
“The 10 treatments have been replicated four times in four randomised blocks.
“The plants have stood up well considering the low growing season rainfall,” she said.
Mr Seagreen agreed pointing to the value of in-furrow nutrient management.
“I think what we’re seeing here is the start of a revolution in broadacre crop establishment,” he said.
“The idea of near-row crop establishment essentially sets up nutrient furrows for the life of the paddock, with incremental movement away from the previous year’s crop rows without disturbing the stubble.
“It provides an ideal environment to better manage nutrient application via liquids, concentrating on achieving a balanced nutrient ration, so to speak, to plants.
“This then sets up plants, in the presence of moisture, to better withstand disease pressures and frost events while meeting yield targets.”
“We have introduced nano technology with our liquid nutrients for faster uptake by plants but also to improve delivery flow from the tank to the bar without blockages.
“Our Calbud product, for example, has a dual action in correcting pH in the furrow to allow roots to get through chemical barriers to access moisture and providing good potassium and carbon management.
“This is part of the process which elevates plant sugar content and creates a moisture-holding environment around roots which reduces plant transpiration.
“So with good nutrient management balance, moisture and microbiology, I see furrow management as the best cost effective way of growing good crops.
“I believe it’s the way of the future world-wide.”
According to Ausplow general manager Chris Farmer, the trials mark the start of an on-going R&D project by Ausplow to not only evaluate products but also assess efficient product delivery and machinery design.
“We’re taking a holistic approach to crop establishment which has always been a feature of Ausplow as a manufacturer, to adapt technology to make agriculture more sustainable,” he said.

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Saturday, October 26, 2019