While the majority of current research focuses on soil amelioration techniques, Ausplow's fopcus is on a sustainable approach, through our 'pot plant' crop establishment techniques.

While the majority of current research focuses on soil amelioration techniques, Ausplow's fopcus is on a sustainable approach, through our 'pot plant' crop establishment techniques.

(PART ONE OF A THREE-PART SERIES)

By John Ryan AM
It has been an interesting few months for me as I have reviewed a lot of stories relating to increasing crop yields.
Soil amelioration is obviously the number one topic at the moment whether it’s using mouldboard ploughs, one-way ploughs, spading, offset discs or deep ripping, to work clay, dolomite, lime, gypsum or a number of other ameliorants and topsoil, into the subsoil.
There can be various strategies for ameliorating soil, from overcoming non-wetting, to burying herbicide-resistant weed seeds, to increasing topsoil pH, etc.
And the hope is that whichever strategy you use, you’re improving the soil and therefore on your way to increasing crop yields, with the promise, mainly from researchers, of residual benefits that could last up to five years or more.
A lot of the focus on amelioration is on Western Australia and South Australia’s non-wetting, sandy soils, with the main methods used in SA being delving and clay spreading.
In other parts of the national Wheatbelt, trials have been established by various researchers exploring the use of deep ripping to apply soil amendments such as a leguminous green manure, chicken litter, cereal stubble and gypsum.
Researchers are also monitoring 15 existing long-term trials to help gauge the residual effects, especially the cost-benefits, of soil amelioration in South Australia, Victoria, NSW and Tasmania.
So as we progress through 2020 it is fairly evident researchers are all rowing the same way.
Which leads us to the direction we are taking.
We’ve actually spelt it out in previous editions of Ausfacts that our focus is a sustainable approach, through our ‘pot plant’ crop establishment techniques, with the emphasis on improving soil while making money.
And we’ve been encouraged by our initial trials results from last year at our Quairading research and development centre and by the work being done by our R&D coordinator Dr Margaret Roper (More of her research is published in our What’s New section of our Web page, October 26, 2019).
Margaret and a team of CSIRO researchers have recently released a paper based on 12 years research which is worth reading January 18, 2020).
Again you can access the information on our Web page in our ‘What’s New’ section.
The story has the heading: Is cultivation really the bogeyman of crop establishment?
In our next Ausfacts issue I’ll explain how this story ties in with what we are doing with the DBS.
I would also encourage you to ask your local DBS dealer for a free copy of our book called The Genius of Farmers.
In the meantime, if you are interested in setting up a few trials this year similar to what we are doing at Quairading (see the January edition of Ausfacts), please feel free to contact me at john@ausplowcom.au

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Publish Date: 
Monday, April 27, 2020